WCSA Earns Top Ranking in Operations, Performance for Tenth Consecutive Year

ABINGDON, Va. – For the tenth consecutive year, the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) has been awarded a gold award from the Virginia Department of Health (VDH), the highest possible ranking in operations and performance excellence for water utilities.

WCSA received a 2019 Excellence in Waterworks/Operations Performance Award for the Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant following a 12-month analysis of data by the VDH Office of Drinking Water.

Each year, through Virginia’s Optimization Program, the VDH recognizes drinking water plants that perform above and beyond minimum standards by optimizing and running their treatment process efficiently and effectively. The primary purpose of the program is to reduce risks to public health associated with drinking water.

“We are tremendously honored to have received this top-level performance score for a full decade,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “This award demonstrates WCSA’s long-standing commitment to providing safe drinking water for our customers that meets or exceeds the standards set forth by the VDH.”

Of the 124 conventional surface water treatment plants evaluated by the VDH during 2019, WCSA was among 39 that received a gold award, while 44 received either silver or bronze awards.

“WCSA has the largest permitted capacity and serves the largest number of service connections in the Mount Rogers Planning District,” says Eric R. Herold, PE, VDH district engineer for the Mount Rogers Planning District. “WCSA has consistently been a top performer in the Virginia Optimization Program and was one of 26 plants in Virginia to receive a perfect score for 2019.”

The mission of Virginia’s Optimization Program is “to encourage waterworks to provide water with a quality that exceeds minimum regulatory standards (i.e., as perfect as possible) and to operate water systems in an exemplary manner (i.e., as effective and functional as possible).”

Over a period of time, through research and plant performance studies conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the American Water Works Association and the waterworks industry, the VDH has developed performance goals for clarification and filtration processes in surface water treatment plants. For Virginia’s Optimization Program, drinking water programs throughout the commonwealth submit monthly operation reports containing operational data.

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves more than 21,500 water connections and approximately 2,500 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of an estimated 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 3.1-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 28 pump stations and 26 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 100 miles of wastewater collection lines, 29 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

Washington County Board of Supervisors Appoints Cathy Miller to WCSA Board of Commissioners

ABINGDON, Va. — The Washington County Board of Supervisors has appointed Cathy Miller to serve on the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) Board of Commissioners, effective immediately. Miller represents the Taylor Election District on the board, and fills the unexpired four-year term of her late uncle, Jim McCall, which began July 1, 2017.

A Washington County native, Miller has lived in the Meadowview community her entire life. She has worked in health care for three decades as a registered radiologic technologist and a certified pedorthist. Miller has served as a Washington County election officer for the past eight years, holds officer positions on the Clinch Mountain District United Methodist Executive Board and the local unit of United Methodist Women, and volunteers with the United Way of Southwest Virginia’s Backpacks Unite Program at Rhea Valley Elementary School. She and her husband, Tony, have two children and three grandchildren.

“On behalf of WCSA and the Board of Commissioners, we are pleased to welcome Cathy Miller to the board,” says Dwain Miller, chairman of the WCSA board. “Cathy is a lifelong resident of the Taylor Election District, and will bring added insight and experience to the table as we work to serve the citizens of Washington County and surrounding areas.”

The WCSA Board of Commissioners includes seven members who represent the Washington County election districts of Harrison, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Taylor, Tyler and Wilson. Along with Dwain Miller, who represents the Tyler District, board members include Vice Chairman David Campbell (Harrison District), Kenneth Taylor (Jefferson District), Kevin Thayer (Madison District), Tim Orfield (Monroe District) and Vernon Smith (Wilson District).

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 22,000 water connections and 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of an estimated 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 3.1-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 29 pump stations and 22 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 29 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

WCSA Temporarily Suspends Service Disconnections

ABINGDON, Va. — In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) is temporarily suspending disconnection of water and sewer service due to nonpayment of bills.

“In light of the numerous closings and other precautionary measures taking place as a result of the spread of this virus, we feel it is in the best interest of our customers to relax our policy on nonpayment during this time,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA.

WCSA customers may contact the customer service department at 276-628-7151 should they have any questions about their service.

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 22,000 water connections and 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of an estimated 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 3.1-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 29 pump stations and 22 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 29 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

WCSA Earns Top Ranking in Operations, Performance for Ninth Consecutive Year

ABINGDON, Va. – For the ninth consecutive year, the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) has been awarded the highest possible ranking in operations and performance excellence for water utilities by the Virginia Department of Health (VDH).

WCSA received a 2018 Excellence in Waterworks/Operations Performance Award for the Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant following a 12-month analysis of data by the VDH Office of Drinking Water.

Each year, through Virginia’s Optimization Program, the VDH recognizes drinking water plants that perform above and beyond minimum standards by optimizing and running their treatment process efficiently and effectively. The primary purpose of the program is to reduce risks to public health associated with drinking water.

Of the 131 conventional surface water treatment plants evaluated by the VDH during 2018, WCSA was among 15 that received a gold award, while 58 received either silver or bronze awards.

“WCSA has the largest permitted capacity and serves the largest number of service connections in the Mount Rogers Planning District, and has consistently been a top performer in the Virginia Optimization Program,” says Eric R. Herold, PE, VDH district engineer for the Mount Rogers Planning District. “Of the 10 conventional surface water plants in our district, WCSA’s Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant was one of four to receive a gold award.”

The mission of Virginia’s Optimization Program is “to encourage waterworks to provide water with a quality that exceeds minimum regulatory standards (i.e., as perfect as possible) and to operate water systems in an exemplary manner (i.e., as effective and functional as possible).”

“It is a great honor to receive this top-level performance score nine years in a row,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “This award demonstrates WCSA’s long-standing commitment to providing safe, potable water for our customers that meets or exceeds the standards set forth by the VDH.”

Over a period of time, through research and plant performance studies conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the American Water Works Association and the waterworks industry, the VDH has developed performance goals for clarification and filtration processes in surface water treatment plants. For Virginia’s Optimization Program, drinking water programs throughout the commonwealth submit monthly operation reports containing operational data.

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 22,000 water connections and 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of an estimated 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 3.1-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 29 pump stations and 22 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 29 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

Joint Special Meeting Results in Amendment to Wastewater Service Agreement for Washington County

Modification will expand public wastewater services to hundreds of residents and businesses, increase jobs and bring additional revenue to Abingdon

ABINGDON, Va. – The Abingdon Town Council, Washington County Board of Supervisors and Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) Board of Commissioners unanimously approved an amendment to the wastewater service agreement between all three entities at a joint special meeting held Tuesday evening.

This action, which amends the 2010 agreement, enlarges WCSA’s existing wastewater service area to include most of the Wilson District, located in western Washington County, produces additional jobs and increases Abingdon’s annual revenues.

In addition, the amendment enables WCSA to complete a long-envisioned expansion of sanitary sewer services to residents and businesses in the western portion of Washington County. In 2018, the service authority secured $18.5 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development’s Rural Utilities Service to extend a sewer conveyance system to residents and businesses along Lee Highway and Jonesboro Road between Exit 13 and the city of Bristol, Virginia. Approximately 111 existing residents and businesses will immediately receive public wastewater service as a result of this project, while an estimated 731 additional existing residents and businesses will have access to public sewer service when the overall expansion project is complete.

“This modification to the original agreement is the result of a lot of hard work that has been put forth by committed individuals on behalf of the town, county and WCSA — people who are determined to achieve the best possible outcome for residents and businesses in our community,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “This project is the next step in a long line of forward-thinking objectives that will provide the backbone for a sewer conveyance system along these two corridors (Lee Highway and Jonesboro Road).”

Currently in the planning stages, the project is expected to take approximately three years from initial design to completion and will be executed in a series of phases.

“We are very excited to obtain sewer service for this area,” says Dwayne Ball, member of the Washington County Board of Supervisors, who represents the Wilson District. “I believe that it will be a great asset to the area and will promote business growth in the county. Many neighborhoods in the area will benefit from the line extension as well.”

Since 2011, WCSA has invested approximately $15.3 million to complete four wastewater service projects, resulting in access to public wastewater service for 386 existing residents and businesses, and provision of a half-million gallons per day of wastewater capacity to the Oak Park Center for Business and Industry at no upfront cost. Along with providing a much-needed service to existing and future residents and businesses, these past and current projects account for 169 direct and 371 indirect jobs. According to the Water Research Foundation, for every $1 million invested in a water or wastewater project, there is a direct impact of five jobs and an indirect impact of 11 jobs.

These investments also bring added revenue for the town of Abingdon. Upon completion, the sewer conveyance system project is expected to generate an additional $290,000 in new annual wastewater revenue. As adjoining neighborhoods are connected to the system, the town is expected to receive a total of $340,000 in new annual wastewater revenue.

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 22,000 water connections and 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of an estimated 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 3.1-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 29 pump stations and 22 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 29 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

WCSA Receives $18.5 Million in USDA Rural Development Funding for Sewer Expansion Project

ABINGDON, Va. ― The Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) recently received $18.5 million in financial assistance from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development’s Rural Utilities Service (RUS).

The funding package includes an RUS grant in the amount of $9,165,000 and an RUS loan in the amount of $9,355,000. The funding will be used to extend sanitary sewer to residents and businesses along Lee Highway and Jonesboro Road between Exit 13 and the city of Bristol, Virginia.

“We are delighted to receive RUS funding to help us provide crucial sewer services to more of our community members,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “This is one of the largest grants in WCSA’s history. When constructed, this project will provide the backbone for a sewer conveyance system along the Lee Highway corridor area, and will also enable WCSA to extend public sewer service from the conveyance system into neighborhoods along these two corridors.”

When the overall sewer expansion project is complete, approximately 842 existing residents and businesses will have access to public sewer service.

“We are very excited about the prospect of obtaining sewer service for this area,” says Dwayne Ball, member of the Washington County Board of Supervisors, who represents the Wilson election district. “I believe that it will be a great asset to the area and will promote business growth in the county. Many neighborhoods in the area will benefit from the line extension as well. I greatly appreciate the work that Robbie Cornett and the Washington County Service Authority did in procuring the grant. I would also like to thank Rep. Morgan Griffith and his staff for their efforts in the process. Our board looks forward to working with them on future endeavors.”

The RUS administers programs that provide much-needed infrastructure or infrastructure improvements to rural communities. These include water and waste treatment, electric power and telecommunications services. All of these services play a critical role in helping to expand economic opportunities and improve the quality of life for rural residents. Utilities programs connect rural residents to the global economy by developing reliable and affordable rural water and wastewater systems, among other services, systems and technologies.

“Several years ago, the board of supervisors and WCSA’s board of commissioners commissioned a study on the provision of sewer service in the Exit 13 area,” Cornett says. “Since that time, we have been fortunate to achieve several projects that have benefited a number of residents and businesses in the Exit 13 area. This newest project is the next step in a long line of forward-thinking objectives that will help bring public sewer service to this portion of Washington County.”

The RUS-funded project will involve the construction of nearly 67,000 feet of force main line, more than 42,000 feet of gravity sewer line and four pumping stations. The project is currently in the planning stages and will be completed in a series of phases.

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 22,000 water connections and approximately 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of approximately 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 2.5-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 29 pump stations and 22 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 29 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

 

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

WCSA Earns Top Ranking in Operations, Performance for Eighth Consecutive Year

ABINGDON, Va. – For the eighth consecutive year, the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) has been awarded the highest possible ranking in operations and performance excellence for water utilities by the Virginia Department of Health (VDH).

WCSA received a 2017 Excellence in Waterworks/Operations Performance Award for the Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant following a 12-month analysis of data by the VDH Office of Drinking Water.

Each year, through Virginia’s Optimization Program, the VDH recognizes drinking water plants that perform above and beyond minimum standards by optimizing and running their treatment process efficiently and effectively. The primary purpose of the program is to reduce risks to public health associated with drinking water.

Of the 131 conventional surface water treatment plants evaluated by the VDH during 2017, WCSA was among 35 that received a gold award, while 50 received either silver or bronze awards.

“WCSA has the largest permitted capacity and serves the largest number of service connections in the Mount Rogers Planning District, and has consistently been a top performer in the Virginia Optimization Program,” says Eric R. Herold, PE, VDH district engineer for the Mount Rogers Planning District. “Of the 11 conventional surface water plants in our district, WCSA’s Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant was one of eight plants to receive a gold award.”

The mission of Virginia’s Optimization Program is “to encourage waterworks to provide water with a quality that exceeds minimum regulatory standards (i.e., as perfect as possible) and to operate water systems in an exemplary manner (i.e., as effective and functional as possible).”

“We are truly honored to have received this top-level performance score for eight years in a row,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “This award demonstrates WCSA’s long-standing commitment to providing a safe, dependable supply of drinking water at a reasonable cost for our customers that meets or exceeds the standards set forth by the VDH.”

Over a period of time, through research and plant performance studies conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the American Water Works Association and the waterworks industry, the VDH has developed performance goals for clarification and filtration processes in surface water treatment plants. For Virginia’s Optimization Program, drinking water programs throughout the commonwealth submit monthly operation reports containing operational data.

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 22,000 water connections and approximately 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of approximately 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 2.5-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 29 pump stations and 22 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 29 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

WCSA Earns Top Ranking in Operations, Performance for Eighth Consecutive Year

ABINGDON, Va. – For the eighth consecutive year, the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) has been awarded the highest possible ranking in operations and performance excellence for water utilities by the Virginia Department of Health (VDH).

WCSA received a 2017 Excellence in Waterworks/Operations Performance Award for the Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant following a 12-month analysis of data by the VDH Office of Drinking Water.

Each year, through Virginia’s Optimization Program, the VDH recognizes drinking water plants that perform above and beyond minimum standards by optimizing and running their treatment process efficiently and effectively. The primary purpose of the program is to reduce risks to public health associated with drinking water.

Of the 131 conventional surface water treatment plants evaluated by the VDH during 2017, WCSA was among 35 that received a gold award, while 50 received either silver or bronze awards.

“WCSA has the largest permitted capacity and serves the largest number of service connections in the Mount Rogers Planning District, and has consistently been a top performer in the Virginia Optimization Program,” says Eric R. Herold, PE, VDH district engineer for the Mount Rogers Planning District. “Of the 11 conventional surface water plants in our district, WCSA’s Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant was one of eight plants to receive a gold award.”

The mission of Virginia’s Optimization Program is “to encourage waterworks to provide water with a quality that exceeds minimum regulatory standards (i.e., as perfect as possible) and to operate water systems in an exemplary manner (i.e., as effective and functional as possible).”

“We are truly honored to have received this top-level performance score for eight years in a row,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “This award demonstrates WCSA’s long-standing commitment to providing a safe, dependable supply of drinking water at a reasonable cost for our customers that meets or exceeds the standards set forth by the VDH.”

Over a period of time, through research and plant performance studies conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the American Water Works Association and the waterworks industry, the VDH has developed performance goals for clarification and filtration processes in surface water treatment plants. For Virginia’s Optimization Program, drinking water programs throughout the commonwealth submit monthly operation reports containing operational data.

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 22,000 water connections and approximately 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of approximately 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 2.5-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 29 pump stations and 22 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 29 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

Washington County Board of Supervisors Appoints Kenneth Nurre to WCSA Board of Commissioners

ABINGDON, Va. — The Washington County Board of Supervisors has appointed Kenneth Nurre to serve a four-year term on the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) Board of Commissioners. Effective July 1, 2017, Nurre, who is a resident of Meadowview, Virginia, represents the Monroe Election District on the board.

An Iowa native and U.S. Air Force veteran who specialized in aerospace ground equipment, Nurre has worked in the aircraft, manufacturing and water treatment industries. He retired in 2000 after nearly 16 years as the owner and operator of Technical Maintenance and Service Co., Inc., which provided manufacturing troubleshooting and equipment repair assistance for municipal and rural water and wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota.

“On behalf of WCSA and the Board of Commissioners, we are pleased to welcome Kenneth to the board,” says Kenneth Taylor, chairman of the WCSA board. “Kenneth is a strong leader with valuable insight and expertise in the water and wastewater industry. We are confident he will be a great asset to the board as we seek to better serve the citizens of Washington County and surrounding areas.”

The WCSA Board of Commissioners includes seven members who represent the Washington County election districts of Harrison, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Taylor, Tyler and Wilson. Nurre replaces Mark Nelson. Along with Taylor, who represents the Jefferson District, board members include Dwain Miller (Tyler District), Jim McCall (Taylor District), Vernon Smith (Wilson District), David Campbell (Harrison District) and Mike White (Madison District).

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 21,000 water connections and approximately 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of approximately 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 2.5-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 26 pump stations and 20 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 26 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

 

For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

WCSA Earns Top Ranking in Operations, Performance for Seventh Consecutive Year

ABINGDON, Va. – For the seventh consecutive year, the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) has been awarded the highest possible ranking in operations and performance excellence for water utilities by the Virginia Department of Health (VDH).

WCSA received a 2016 Excellence in Waterworks/Operations Performance Award following a 12-month analysis of data by the VDH Office of Drinking Water.

Each year, through Virginia’s Optimization Program, the VDH recognizes drinking water plants that perform above and beyond minimum standards by optimizing and running their treatment process efficiently and effectively. The primary purpose of the program is to reduce risks to public health associated with drinking water.

WCSA’s Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant was one of 21 water treatment plants in Virginia to earn a perfect score in the judging criteria. Of the 129 conventional surface water treatment plants evaluated, WCSA was among 34 that received a gold award, while 53 received either silver or bronze awards.

“WCSA has the largest permitted capacity and serves the largest number of service connections in the Mount Rogers Planning District, and has consistently been a top performer in the Virginia Optimization Program,” says Eric R. Herold, PE, VDH district engineer for the Mount Rogers Planning District. “Of the 11 conventional surface water plants in our district, WCSA’s Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant was one of five plants to receive a perfect performance score for 2016 operations, and one of six plants to receive a gold award.”

The mission of Virginia’s Optimization Program is “to encourage waterworks to provide water with a quality that exceeds minimum regulatory standards (i.e., as perfect as possible) and to operate water systems in an exemplary manner (i.e., as effective and functional as possible).”

“It is an honor to receive this top-level performance score seven years in a row,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “Our goal is to always provide our customers with the highest-quality drinking water at the lowest possible cost, and this recognition affirms our commitment to that goal.”

Over a period of time, through research and plant performance studies conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the American Waterworks Association and the waterworks industry, the VDH has developed performance goals for clarification and filtration processes in surface water treatment plants. For Virginia’s Optimization Program, drinking water programs throughout the commonwealth submit monthly operation reports containing operational data.

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 21,000 water connections and approximately 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of approximately 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 2.5-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 26 pump stations and 20 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 26 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.