Washington County Board of Supervisors Appoints Kenneth Nurre to WCSA Board of Commissioners

ABINGDON, Va. — The Washington County Board of Supervisors has appointed Kenneth Nurre to serve a four-year term on the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) Board of Commissioners. Effective July 1, 2017, Nurre, who is a resident of Meadowview, Virginia, represents the Monroe Election District on the board.

An Iowa native and U.S. Air Force veteran who specialized in aerospace ground equipment, Nurre has worked in the aircraft, manufacturing and water treatment industries. He retired in 2000 after nearly 16 years as the owner and operator of Technical Maintenance and Service Co., Inc., which provided manufacturing troubleshooting and equipment repair assistance for municipal and rural water and wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota.

“On behalf of WCSA and the Board of Commissioners, we are pleased to welcome Kenneth to the board,” says Kenneth Taylor, chairman of the WCSA board. “Kenneth is a strong leader with valuable insight and expertise in the water and wastewater industry. We are confident he will be a great asset to the board as we seek to better serve the citizens of Washington County and surrounding areas.”

The WCSA Board of Commissioners includes seven members who represent the Washington County election districts of Harrison, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Taylor, Tyler and Wilson. Nurre replaces Mark Nelson. Along with Taylor, who represents the Jefferson District, board members include Dwain Miller (Tyler District), Jim McCall (Taylor District), Vernon Smith (Wilson District), David Campbell (Harrison District) and Mike White (Madison District).

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 21,000 water connections and approximately 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of approximately 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 2.5-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 26 pump stations and 20 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 26 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

 

For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

WCSA Earns Top Ranking in Operations, Performance for Seventh Consecutive Year

ABINGDON, Va. – For the seventh consecutive year, the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) has been awarded the highest possible ranking in operations and performance excellence for water utilities by the Virginia Department of Health (VDH).

WCSA received a 2016 Excellence in Waterworks/Operations Performance Award following a 12-month analysis of data by the VDH Office of Drinking Water.

Each year, through Virginia’s Optimization Program, the VDH recognizes drinking water plants that perform above and beyond minimum standards by optimizing and running their treatment process efficiently and effectively. The primary purpose of the program is to reduce risks to public health associated with drinking water.

WCSA’s Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant was one of 21 water treatment plants in Virginia to earn a perfect score in the judging criteria. Of the 129 conventional surface water treatment plants evaluated, WCSA was among 34 that received a gold award, while 53 received either silver or bronze awards.

“WCSA has the largest permitted capacity and serves the largest number of service connections in the Mount Rogers Planning District, and has consistently been a top performer in the Virginia Optimization Program,” says Eric R. Herold, PE, VDH district engineer for the Mount Rogers Planning District. “Of the 11 conventional surface water plants in our district, WCSA’s Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant was one of five plants to receive a perfect performance score for 2016 operations, and one of six plants to receive a gold award.”

The mission of Virginia’s Optimization Program is “to encourage waterworks to provide water with a quality that exceeds minimum regulatory standards (i.e., as perfect as possible) and to operate water systems in an exemplary manner (i.e., as effective and functional as possible).”

“It is an honor to receive this top-level performance score seven years in a row,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “Our goal is to always provide our customers with the highest-quality drinking water at the lowest possible cost, and this recognition affirms our commitment to that goal.”

Over a period of time, through research and plant performance studies conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the American Waterworks Association and the waterworks industry, the VDH has developed performance goals for clarification and filtration processes in surface water treatment plants. For Virginia’s Optimization Program, drinking water programs throughout the commonwealth submit monthly operation reports containing operational data.

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 21,000 water connections and approximately 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of approximately 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 2.5-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 26 pump stations and 20 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 26 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

Melinda Jett Named Controller for Washington County Service Authority

In her new role, Jett directs WCSA’s financial affairs, and serves as a member of the capital improvement funding, planning and leadership teams.

Jett brings more than two decades of experience to her new position. She comes to WCSA from Highlands Union Bank in Abingdon, where she served as director of internal audit for the past 10 years. In that role, she managed all financial, operational and technology audits of the bank.

“We are delighted to welcome Melinda to our team,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “Her extensive knowledge of auditing standards and procedures, along with her experience in accounting and regulatory compliance, will be of great benefit to WCSA.”

A native of Abingdon, Virginia, Jett earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from the University of Tennessee. She resides in Abingdon with her husband, Bruce. Her daughters, Amanda and Ashton, are both pursuing studies at East Tennessee State University.

“I’m very excited to join WCSA,” says Jett. “I’m very impressed with everyone’s professionalism and dedication, and I look forward to serving our community with such a committed team.”

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 21,000 water connections and approximately 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of approximately 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 2.5-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 26 pump stations and 20 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 26 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,

general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

Washington County Board of Supervisors Appoints Campbell, White to WCSA Board of Commissioners

ABINGDON, Va. — The Washington County Board of Supervisors has appointed two new members to serve four-year terms on the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) Board of Commissioners. As of July 1, 2015, David Campbell of Abingdon, Virginia, represents the Harrison Election District, and Mike White, also of Abingdon, represents the Madison Election District on the board.

Campbell, an Abingdon native, retired from Southern States Cooperative in 2008 after nearly 37 years of service. He serves as president of the Smyth/Washington County Cattlemen’s Association, and sits on the policy and industry advocacy board of the Virginia Cattlemen’s Association. Campbell is also a member of the Abingdon Feeder Calf Association, the Southwest Virginia Agricultural Council, the New River Valley Hereford Association, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the Virginia Hereford Association and the Virginia Beef Cattle Improvement Association.

White has lived in Washington County for 50 years and is a sales representative with C.W. Williams & Co., LLC. With an extensive background in emergency services, he also serves as a firefighter and paramedic with the fire department of the Holston Army Ammunition Plant in Mt. Carmel, Tennessee, and as a paramedic at Bristol Motor Speedway. Additionally, White volunteers at the Virginia Department of Corrections and as the assistant chief of the Brumley Gap Fire Department. Since 1980, he has served with the Virginia Department of Forestry as a fire warden and strike team leader. He served as a volunteer engineer, firefighter and paramedic for 24 years at the Abingdon Fire Department.

“On behalf of WCSA and the Board of Commissioners, we welcome our two new members,” says   Kenneth Taylor, chairman of the WCSA board. “David and Mike are both well-respected leaders in Washington County, and we are confident they will be a great asset to the board as we seek to meet the water and wastewater service needs of this community.”

The WCSA Board of Commissioners is comprised of seven members who represent the Washington County election districts of Harrison, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Taylor, Tyler and Wilson. Campbell replaces Frank Stephon and White replaces Joe Chase. Along with Taylor, who represents the Jefferson District, board members include Devere Hutchinson (Wilson District), Jim McCall (Taylor District), Dwain Miller (Tyler District) and Mark Nelson (Monroe District)

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 21,000 water connections and approximately 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of approximately 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 2.5-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 26 pump stations and 20 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 26 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,

general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

WCSA Achieves State and Federal Compliance for Drinking Water Quality, Reporting and Monitoring

ABINGDON, Va. – The Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) recently published its annual Drinking Water Quality Report (a.k.a. Consumer Confidence Report) for calendar year 2014, which revealed that drinking water provided by the authority meets or exceeds all state and federal requirements for quality, reporting and monitoring.

The report is designed to inform WCSA customers about the quality of their drinking water and WCSA’s efforts to protect its water supply. In addition, the report explains where WCSA’s water comes from, what it contains, and the specific sampling and treatment processes performed by the authority to prevent health risks.

The report is available on WCSA’s website, www.wcsawater.com.

“One of our goals is to provide exceptional water service at a reasonable cost,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “This report verifies that WCSA continues to deliver a safe, top-quality product for Washington County businesses and residents.”

WCSA draws its water from several sources, including the Middle Fork of the Holston River; the South Fork of the Holston River; the Cole, Widener and Jones Springs at Mill Creek; and Reservation Spring in Taylors Valley. An additional ground water source is purchased from the town of Saltville for customers near Hayters Gap.

Water from the Middle and South Fork is treated at the Middle Fork Drinking Water Plant, while water from the Cole, Widener and Jones Springs are treated at the Mill Creek Drinking Water Plant. Reservation Spring does not require a treatment process, only the addition of chlorine and fluoride. These sources and facilities have a combined capacity to treat more than 15 million gallons of water per day. On average, WCSA performs 150 bacterial tests per month on its water treatment system.

More information about WCSA’s water distribution process and its treatment methods can be accessed via the water authority’s website, www.wcsawater.com.

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 21,000 water connections and approximately 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of approximately 900 miles of water line, a 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 2.5-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 26 pump stations and 20 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 26 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visit www.wcsawater.com.

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,
general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.

WCSA Earns Top Ranking in Operations, Performance for Fifth Consecutive Year

ABINGDON, Va. – For the fifth consecutive year, the Washington County Service Authority (WCSA) has been awarded the highest possible ranking in operations/performance excellence for water utilities by the Virginia Department of Health (VDH).

The WCSA’s Middle Fork drinking water plant was one of 37 conventional water treatment plants (out of 132 in Virginia) that received a gold award following a 12-month analysis of data by the VDH Office of Drinking Water.

Each year, through Virginia’s Optimization Program, the VDH recognizes drinking water plants that perform above and beyond minimum standards by optimizing and running their treatment process efficiently and effectively. The primary purpose of the program is to reduce the risks to public health associated with drinking water.

WCSA’s Middle Fork plant, along with 21 others statewide, earned a performance score of 20 in the judging criteria, with 20 being the highest possible score.

“A number one ranking means this water is three times cleaner than the standards require,” says Charles Rest, VDH District Two engineer and chairman of the Virginia Optimization Program. “WCSA is one of only 22 plants in the state that earned a perfect score.”

The mission of Virginia’s Optimization Program is “to encourage waterworks to provide water with a quality that exceeds minimum regulatory standards (i.e., as perfect as possible) and to operate water systems in an exemplary manner (i.e., as effective and functional as possible).”

“Providing our customers with the highest-quality drinking water at the lowest possible cost is always our goal,” says Robbie Cornett, general manager of WCSA. “We are honored to receive this top-level performance score five years in a row.”

Over a period of time, through research and plant performance studies by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the American Waterworks Association and the waterworks industry, the VDH has developed performance goals for clarification and filtration processes in surface water treatment plants. For Virginia’s Optimization Program, drinking water programs throughout the commonwealth submit monthly operation reports containing operational data.

More About WCSA

The WCSA serves approximately 21,000 water connections and approximately 2,300 wastewater connections in Washington County, Virginia, and surrounding areas. The water system consists of approximately 900 miles of water line, a new (2014) 12-million-gallon-per-day surface water treatment plant, a 2.5-million-gallon-per-day membrane filtration plant, two springs, one well, 26 pump stations and 20 water storage tanks. The wastewater system consists of approximately 70 miles of wastewater collection lines, 26 lift stations and two wastewater treatment plants. For more information about WCSA, visitwww.wcsawater.com.

 

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For additional information, contact Robbie Cornett,

general manager, at 276-628-7151, ext. 224.